Yes, I have found Spam in Japan (without looking for it). Since then, I’ve been trying to come to grips with that fact and to recover emotionally.

 

 

11 thoughts on “Spam in Japan”

    1. Can you find spam in your islands?
      I thought it was only in culinary disaster zones like North America. (well, I just found out that you can find it in Japan too, so we never know)

    1. I haven’t fully recovered yet, I’m just trying to.
      I mean, as mentioned in a previous comment, I understand Spam in culinary devastated zones (i.e. North America) but in Japan… This is beyond my comprehension… (I guess the Okinawan connection is to blame)

  1. I don’t ussually see it eitehr except for in Okinawan grocery stores. I have been tempted to buy a can just to remember what it tastes like on bread. (But it is not bad in Okinawan food.)

    1. Yeah, I’ve heard about the Spam in Okinawa thing (one of the many things Americans have messed up on this island).
      I took this picture in a strange store called Don Quijote, well ドン・キホーテ You may know that brand, but in case you don’t it was a very strange store where you could find a lot of strange things. Like tacky wigs almost right next to good French wine.

  2. Spam? Oh, yuck!! I ate it during my childhood, jello too. Thought it was yummy back then. Didn’t know any better. “Culinary disaster zone” sadly describes much of the U.S. Those of us who know how to enjoy good food are a minority, but we DO exist.

  3. “… one of the many things Americans have messed up on this island”. Hmm, I beg your pardon, but it’s the Japanese who buy such products that have decided to mess things up for themselves. Sad, but true. I wish people would learn to say no to junk food.

    1. Do you know the history of japan post WW2? And especially Okinawa?
      It’s not different from the Marshall Plan in Europe, well, it’s a little worse actually.

      People don’t decide to start buying something out of nowhere. What got you to think that?

      How do you think the US became the powerhouse that it became postwar? By selling their stuff in all the countries that was badly damaged because of the war.
      The Americanization of the world started there.
      America rebuilt Europe and Japan not out of goodwill, but because they represented new markets upon which they could extend their influence.
      And it’s nowhere truer than in Okinawa, even today.

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